FRAMESHOP:FRAMESHOP: THE FRAME IS OVER

Americans have been patient with President Bush's "War on Terror" approach to National Security, but it is now clear to everyone that this concept is not working. The failure of President Bush's "War on Terror" is much larger than the...

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Jeffrey Feldman, Editor-in-Chief
Frameshop, 07/27/2005

Americans have been patient with President Bush's "War on Terror" approach to National Security, but it is now clear to everyone that this concept is not working.

The failure of President Bush's "War on Terror" is much larger than the violent stalemate that has trapped our soldiers in Iraq. The "War on Terror" has failed profoundly as an act leadership.

As a result of President Bush's "War on Terror," many Americans now feel that the country is significantly less safe, that our nation's financial resources have been squandered, and that our government has undermined the very Constitution that we all admire.

The "War on Terror" has made our allies suspicious of our intentions, and our enemies more focused and creative.

The "War on Terror" has caused doubt in our most idealistic and dedicated citizens: those who view the military as the highest form of service.

The "War on Terror" has increased tensions between branches of government and between political parties.

The "War on Terror" has led to scandal and unethical behavior at the very heart of our political system.

One might concede that all of these problems would be acceptable if Americans now felt an overwhelming sense of security as a result of the "War on Terror." But Americans do not feel that.

Americans look at the recent train bombings in London and they ask, "Will we be next?"

In the years following 9/11, not once have we heard our friends and family express confidence in President Bush's "War on Terror." There are no parents in American who say to their children, "Don't worry. The President's "War on Terror" will keep us safe."

Instead, the "War on Terror" has created an ever growing sense of fear and dread in America. And the "War on Terror" has given rise to a form of leadership from the White House that is increasingly tinged with threatening and belligerent tones--towards our enemies and our own citizens.

Never in the history of this great country have we ever had a President who has routinely stood before the nation and the world and threatened to "hunt down" and "kill" those who threaten America. This language and tone of killing and destruction, of anger and of threat, is not the form of leadership that inspires Americans or brings safety to the nation.

American's long for a new form of leadership on national security. We do not want to hear Osama Bin Laden threaten to kill us and our families, and we do not want to hear our President use the same threatening and violent words in his response. We have had enough.

And Americans are tired of being told that the "War on Terror" requires that our President place himself above the Constitution, but then also requires him to hide behind it when honest Americans ask questions.

Americans want a new vision for national security. Americans want to be part of the project of protecting their nation and inspiring our allies.

The first step in this direction is to throw out the language and tone of President Bush's "War on Terror," and then to develop a new way of talking and thinking about the national security problems that we face as a nation.

The "War on Terror" is just one way to talk about those problems. And its time is over.

Over the course of the next few days, Frameshop will be rolling out a new frame for national security that uses an entirely new set of terms and ideas to discuss the dangers and solutions we face as a nation.

This new frame is about much more than winning elections. It is about the safety and security of our family, our nation and our world.

The old frame is over.

© Jeffrey Feldman 2005, Frameshop

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