FRAMESHOP:FRAMESHOP: BUSH'S SADDAM HUSSEIN SANDWICH

In his last televised press conference, when asked what Iraq had to do with the attacks of 9/11, President Bush responded: Nothing. One week later, President Bush is back to his old ways: pimping the war in Iraq by linking...

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Jeffrey Feldman, Editor-in-Chief
Frameshop, 08/31/2006

In his last televised press conference, when asked what Iraq had to do with the attacks of 9/11, President Bush responded:  Nothing.   One week later, President Bush is back to his old ways: pimping the war in Iraq by linking Saddam Hussein to 9/11.

But notice the President's rhetorical tactic:   Bush makes a Saddam Hussein sandwich.  Rather than actually saying the sentence:  Iraq attacked us on 9/11, President Bush puts a big stack of Saddam Hussein between two pieces of terrorism and 9/11. 

If we read over a passage from President Bush's recent remarks in Tennessee, we can see exactly how Bush builds the Saddam Hussein sandwich.

This passage comes from Bush's remarks in Tennessee:

One of the lessons of September the 11th is that this nation must take threats seriously before they come to hurt us; that we just can't hope anymore that things calm down, or that there's a rational way of thinking with an enemy; that we must be bold in our actions in defense of the American people. I saw a threat in Iraq, and so did members of the United States Congress of both political parties. Saddam Hussein was a state sponsor of terror. Saddam Hussein had used weapons of mass destruction. Saddam Hussein had been shooting at our pilots. Saddam Hussein paid families of suicide bombers. Saddam Hussein was a threat, and the world is better off without Saddam Hussein in power. (Applause.)

And now the central front in the war on terror, the central front in this struggle to protect ourselves is Iraq. You know, amazing things have happened in Iraq, when you think about it. Oh, I know the news is full with terrible suiciders, and it shakes our will. I know that.    It's troubling for many of our citizens, no matter what their political party is. But that's what the enemy wants. They want to trouble us. They're willing to take innocent life to cause us to forget our mission and purpose and the calling of this in the 21st century.

Notice how the President begins the first paragraph with a direct reference to 'September 11.'  This is what I call the 'slice of September 11.'  There is no question, here, that he is talking about September 11.  But in the rest of the paragraph, rather than ever saying that Saddam Hussein attacked us on September 11, President Bush just piles on a big stack of Saddam Hussein--mentioning the deposed Iraq leader six times.  Right after that--the first line of the next paragraph, President Bush again references September 11 when he says, "the central front in the war on terror."  That second reference is the second 'slice of September 11.'   Just to break this down even more:  if I pull away all the extra filler in those two paragraphs, this what the sandwich looks like:

The lessons of September 11th

Saddam Hussein

Saddam Hussein

Saddam Hussein

Saddam Hussein

Saddam Hussein

Saddam Hussein

Central Front in the War on Terror

Voilà!  Now that's what I call a sandwich!  And that is what President Bush has been and will be serving up to the American public.

If President Bush really wants people to believe that he has stopped selling the war in Iraq by making false claims about the connection between 9/11 and Saddam Hussein, then he should stop feeding us Saddam Hussein sandwiches.

©  2006 Jeffrey Feldman, Frameshop





© Jeffrey Feldman 2006, Frameshop

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